Tina Vansteenbergen

Tina Vansteenbergen


BIO:
Tina speaks to students around North America about how to bring the heart back to their leadership styles and the voices back to women in their organizations and relationships. On a personal note, Tina went to Hamline University for her undergrad and then attended Illinois State University for her Master’s. She is also a proud Minnesotan who will happily pour on her accent when asked.  Tina currently lives in Brooklyn, NY with her extremely long last name and her obnoxiously adorable puppy, Sherri. Connect with her on your favorite social media platform @TinaRaeVan.

Better Friends, Better Women
Workshop Level: Intermediate

Having built only friendships with men in her adolescence and into college, Tina was often considered a “guy’s girl,” and certainly not a friend of women. That is, until, she built her first deep, meaningful friendship with a woman. Research clearly articulates the importance of building relationships with close friends throughout our lives—especially friendship with those sharing similar experiences to our own. Specifically, experiences of womanhood. Women have continued to evolve through community, learning and growing with and from one another. And yet, these communities are moving deeper into the internet, and are often filled with instances of girl-on-girl drama. We talk behind each other’s’ backs. We choose jealousy and resentment over support and love. We compete instead of congratulate.

Ladies, Lets Drop The F-Bomb
Workshop Level: Advanced

Feminism, ladies. We are watching the world change for women, perhaps now more than ever. Whether you marched on Washington in January, you’re a fan of Simone Biles or the all-female Ghostbuster cast, we can’t deny that in 2016 and 2017, women (feminism) is what we’re talking about. What is our role in those conversations? More specifically, what about our role as young women? How about you, what’s your role? Whether you identify as a feminist or not, feeling comfortable, empowered and confident in discussions about our collective womanhood is something every young woman deserves. Rather than debate the semantics of this polarizing word, join in a discussion about women and their place in the world—one where everyone’s voice matters. Let’s learn from one another how powerful it can be when women come together and drop the F Bomb.

Who Runs the World? Girls? Leaders? Stereotypes?
Workshop Level: Intermediate

Learning to be a leader in college is challenging, but can be an especially difficult experience for women. We are often faced with expectations of our adherence to the classic “women’s leadership stereotypes,” or those molds others often attempt to make us fit. Forcing us to choose between being liked or being effective, between loving or cold, between friendly or powerful, limits our ability to find the path to a genuine, confident form of leadership that lies within each of us. Taking time to discuss the stereotypes facing young women leaders is how we begin to move past them. Discovering our own personal styles of leadership while embracing all the talents associated with being women, then, is how we eventually overcome these stereotypes. Join other leaders on the path to self-authorship while we unlock the power of our own personal form of women’s leadership. Because, after all, who runs the world?

Men as Allies: Readiness vs. Resistance
Workshop Level: Advanced

In the fight for equality, it can often feel like we women are working alone. But just as in any other movement of social justice and human rights, we have allies. But are we sure we’re ready for them? There has long been a misconception that all feminists hate men. While we know this is not (always) true, it is certainly the popular narrative for modern day feminism. Because of this, many men are resistant to engage in conversations about equality, and many women who love men choose not to identify as ‘feminists.’ Simultaneously, there are mothers, sisters, partners, friends and lovers of men who proudly wear the badge of feminism, and men readily picking up picket signs and marching until their feet bleed. So where is the disconnect? A dominant patriarchy hurts all of us. Causing women to constantly feel less than, while teaching men the power of toxic masculinity—everyone loses. Learning to assess not only men’s readiness and resistance to collectively achieve equality, but our own, might just be the key to advancing our movement.